Eriogonum grande rubescens, Achillea and Poppy

We explore the California native palette via zoom and self-guided field trips.

This class will be online with zoom discussions weekly along with assignments that get you outdoors. From the Extension website:

“California native landscapes are adapted to our climate, and provide habitat to many California native bees, birds, and mammals. Using native plants in a landscape can make a garden more resilient and drought tolerant.

Participants study the elements of a successful native landscape including native plant communities; healthy soil, use and/or non-use of supplemental irrigation; maintenance requirements; plant sourcing; installation; and use of rainwater. The course will enable students to develop California native plant palettes for common urban micro-climates.

CoVID 19 Update: This course will meet online via weekly zoom meetings.

Self-guided trips include choices of the Los Angeles River, native nurseries, local trails and botanic gardens and  that feature California native plants and water-conserving planting design, as well as the Lyle Center for Regenerative Studies, which advances the principles of environmentally sustainable living.”

6 Fridays 6:30 to 8:30 starting April 9, 2021.
California Natives Biology X499.22, Enrollment #379122. I  believe the class is full, but there is a wait list.

Lili Singer, formerly of the Theodore Payne Foundation, and I will be giving a Q&A on native gardening on Saturday, March 20 at 10 a.m. for the Riverside-San Bernardino Chapter of CNPS. Lili will give a short presentation on Native Color throughout the Year, then Lili and I will take your questions on gardening.

You must register in advance at https://bit.ly/garden321

Now is a good time to plant native milkweed, which is just coming out of dormancy.

Barbara Eisenstein and I led a robust Q&A on milkweed and Monarch butterflies at last week’s San Gabriel Mountains CNPS program meeting. The video and chat will be up on the cnps-sgm.org website here, once it is uploaded. I learned some things I didn’t know, especially about milkweed growing conditions.

Vince Scheidt told us that Narrowleaf Milkweed, Asclepias fascicularis, the one most easily available in local nurseries, is found in clay areas with some moisture. So those with lighter soils may want to water a little more, and possibly a little more often, than just once a week. For established native gardens, this may mean watering the milkweed by hand. Another beautiful milkweed local to the foothills region is Kotolo Milkweed, or Wooly Pod Milkweed, Asclepias eriocarpa.

It is still possible to start milkweed from seed at this point in spring – meaning this week, or at least before the end of March. To be successful the seed would have to be kept moist! For some gardens, especially in the valleys, this may mean daily watering, or you can start the seed in pots. By the way, most of the milkweed found at nurseries is grown from seed.

Many people asked about Oleander Aphids. They can be left on the plant, unless they are impacting the plant’s health. Both Barbara and I remove with our fingers, but they can be sprayed off with water or carefully removed with a Qtip, either dry or wet with rubbing alcohol.

Barbara spoke about the pathogen OE, for which non-native milkweed is a vector. Bob “Bug Bob” Allen has a great youtube about milkweed that goes into great detail about this pathogen, and why planting non-native milkweed in California, even if you cut it down in winter, can spread this pathogen.

There is more information about this at Monarch Parasites, and more information and citizen science at Monarch Watch

Barbara is giving a free zoom lecture tomorrow at 10:00 a.m. on milkweed. Zoom Meeting Instructions can be found on the Instagram Page of Seed Library of LA Altadena,, or email SlolaAltadena@gmail.com to register

I’ll be speaking this Saturday, October 17 at 10 a.m. on Zoom on the Capturing Rainwater for Natives for the Riverside-San Bernardino Chapter of CNPS. Learn important techniques for keeping rainwater on site for happier native plants. This presentation includes appropriate rainwater harvesting and storage, plus some thoughts about greywater and best practices for native plant irrigation.

You must register in advance at https://bit.ly/rsb-rain

Here is a link to the handout: Capturing Rainwater Handout (pdf)

salvia bladderpod rosy buckwheat P1050506

The program will be Easy Natives for Your Garden though the South Coast California Native Plant Society Chapter. The program starts at 7:30 pm, and opens at 7:15.

Why grow native cultivars — the named varieties? Because in many cases these have been selected for their reliability and consistent bloom in the garden. In this talk we will discuss the easiest cultivars and other selected natives that grow reliably in a wide range of gardens, as well as some tips for success.

More information can be found on the South Coast Chapter of CNPS at sccnps.org

P1010212David King, of The Learning Garden and founder of the Seed Library of Los Angeles  and I teach this class which has gotten rave reviews from Extension students. We explore  landscape-level and garden sustainability including watershed, foodshed and local-focused native plantings.

This class will be online with zoom discussions weekly along with assignments that get you outdoors.

“From home and school gardens to commercial sites, our gardens present the perfect place to become more sustainable. Designed for horticulture students, gardening and sustainability professionals, educators, and home gardeners, this course focuses on both gardens and landscape level sustainability.

We prioritize growing and eating food from local gardens and foodsheds and promote pollinator and habitat gardening, featuring native and dryland plant palettes. We touch on permaculture and other sustainable design theories; managing our soils as living systems, and moving away from a consumptive, non-sustainable lifestyle when choosing materials, plants and tools. Students are introduced to the latest water management practices such as swales, earthworks, rain gardens and hugelkultur.

Self-guided trips include choices of the Los Angeles River, the Learning Garden and demonstration gardens that feature California native plants and water-conserving planting design, as well as the Lyle Center for Regenerative Studies, which advances the principles of environmentally sustainable living.”

Thursdays 6:30 to 9:30 starting June 25, 2020. Biology X498.10, Enrollment #374688

“learn to create habitat for pollinators, grow sustainable food, and harvest rainwater”

 

 

Altadena Residence 2

I will be teaching a class on Fire-Safe Landscaping on Saturday, November 16, at 12:15 at the Chevy Chase Library. It will be a compressed version of my TPF class.
It is free to the public.

From their flyer:

“Learn ways to create and maintain a beautiful fire-safe home and landscape. Attendees will review case studies that illustrate simple principles and best practices that may help your property survive a wildfire. Class includes a palette of native plants that can be used to lower fire risk, control erosion, and enhance defensible space.”

Chevy Chase Library
3301 E. Chevy Chase Drive
Glendale, California 91025
818-548-2046
Glendale Library Arts & Culture

Just a reminder that I will be teaching  Fire-Safe Landscaping on Saturday, September 21, at 1:30 at the Theodore Payne Foundation.

I taught the class for members of the Foundation staff on Tuesday, and it was well-received.

Register: Saturday, September 21, 2019, 1:30 pm, $25 members, $35 non-members

Walk-ins will be allowed.

The Theodore Payne Foundation for Native Plants and Wildflowers
10459 Tuxford Street
Sun Valley, California 91352
818-768-1802

picture1

I will be teaching a class on Fire-Safe Landscaping on Saturday, September 21.

From the Theodore Payne site:

“Learn ways to create and maintain a beautiful fire-safe home and landscape. Attendees will review case studies that illustrate simple principles and best practices that may help your property survive a wildfire. Class includes a palette of native plants that can be used to lower fire risk, control erosion, and enhance defensible space.”

Register: Saturday, September 21, 2019, 1:30 pm, $25 members, $35 non-members

The Theodore Payne Foundation for Native Plants and Wildflowers
10459 Tuxford Street
Sun Valley, California 91352
818-768-1802

Bofe Instructors

Greener Gardens: Sustainable Garden Practice will start June 27 at UCLA Extension and runs through August 22.  This class is one of the elective classes for the Gardening and Horticulture Certificate Program and the Sustainability Certificate Program. Instructors are Orchid Black and David King.

This course covers a wide range from theories of sustainable design, to soils, water harvesting from swales and earthworks, to rain tanks and greywater, easy and effective gardening for vegetables and fruit, native and drought tolerant planting palettes, habitat creation and more. We will look at the landscape from a watershed perspective and see how the larger perspective affects our microclimate.

We take field trips to demonstration gardens and the L.A. River.

What can we change as individuals to live a life more in harmony with natural processes?  How can we, in this year of abundant rainfall make changes and improve our immediate surroundings – and how can we lead by example in our own gardens?

Students have told us this course features more than just a few “Aha” moments!

Meeting in 325 Botany Building on UCLA Campus this quarter. Now that we are at the end of our historic drought, many folks are thinking “business as usual,” but from our perspective as instructors, this is the very best time to look at some of the issues that we can change without feeling like we are under the gun to HAVE to change.

Enrollment data includes:  Greener Gardens: Sustainable Garden Practice   6/29/2017 — 8/24/2017    BIOLGY    X 498.10   Reg#: 368168 11 mtgs  6:30 to 9:30 PM